Latest 2.0.0
Homepage https://github.com/johntvolk/TableViewConfigurator
License MIT
Platforms ios 8.0, requires ARC
Dependencies Dwifft
Authors

Version
License
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When implementing UITableView UIs, it is very often the case that you end up with controller objects containing many lines of brittle and error-prone implementations of UITableViewDataSource and UITableViewDelegate.

For example:

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int {
    switch section {

    case selectedItemSection:
        return 1

    case fooSection:
        return self.showFoo ? 4 : 1

    default:
        let thingCount = self.thingCollections[section - 1].things.count

        return thingCount == 0 ? 1 : thingCount

    }
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
    switch indexPath.section {

    case self.selectedItemSection:

        ...

    case fooSection:
        switch indexPath.row {

        case 0:

            ...

        case 1:

            ...

        case 2:

            ...

        case 3:

            ...

        default:

            break

        }

    default:
        let things = self.thingCollections[indexPath.section - 1].things

        if things.count > 0 {
            ...
        } else {
            ...
        }
    }
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, heightForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> CGFloat {
    let section = indexPath.section

    if section != selectedItemSection || (section == selectedItemSection && self.selectedItem == nil) {
        ...
    } else {
        ...
    }
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, didSelectRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) {
    switch indexPath.section {

    case selectedItemSection:
        break

    case fooSection:
        break

    default:
        let things = self.thingCollections[indexPath.section - 1].things

        if things.count > 0 {
            self.performSegueWithIdentifier("showThings", sender: self)
        }
    }

    tableView.deselectRowAtIndexPath(indexPath, animated: true)
}

TableViewConfigurator was created to eliminate this kind of code and replace it with a more declarative approach.

Installation

TableViewConfigurator is available through CocoaPods. To install
it, simply add the following line to your Podfile:

pod "TableViewConfigurator"

Usage

TableViewConfigurator is based around the concepts of RowConfiguration and SectionConfiguration. At the bottom of the conceptual hierachy is the RowConfiguration. A RowConfiguration allows you to specify individual rows or groups of rows that should appear in your UITableView. It currently comes in two flavors: ConstantRowConfiguration and ModelRowConfiguration.

ConstantRowConfiguration

A ConstantRowConfiguration represents a single row in your UITableView. All it takes to create one is an implementation of the ConfigurableTableViewCell protocol that is specified in the constructor of ConstantRowConfiguration via a generic type parameter.

import UIKit
import TableViewConfigurator

class BasicCell: UITableViewCell, ConfigurableTableViewCell {

    func configure() {
        self.textLabel?.text = "Basic Cell"
    }
}

let rowConfiguration = ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>()

At this point rowConfiguration is ready to be used and will have its configure() method called when appropriate. But, there are several different configurations that can be applied before use.

.cellResuseId()

By default, TableViewConfigurator will generate a reuse identifier for your cell class that is equal to the class name. If this isn’t the behavior you want, you can either override buildReuseIdentifier() in your cell class, or specify the reuse identifier in your controller.

let rowConfiguration = ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>().cellReuseId("someReuseId")

.height() / .estimatedHeight()

You can specify the height or estimated height of the cell depending on the sizing method you’re using.

let rowConfiguration = ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>().height(44.0)
let anotherConfiguration = ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>().estimatedHeight(44.0)
.additionalConfig()

You can specify additional configuration that should happen on the cell in your controller context after its configure() method has been called.

let rowConfiguration = ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>()
    .additionalConfig({ (cell) -> Void in
        cell.accessoryType = self.someControllerFlag ? .DisclosureIndicator : .None
    })
.selectionHandler()

You can specify code that should be called in your controller context when the row in the ConstantRowConfiguration is selected.

let rowConfiguration = ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>()
    .selectionHandler({ self.performSegueWithIdentifier("someSegue", sender: self) })
.canEditHandler()

You can specify a closure that determines whether a cell can participate in the UITableView edit workflow.

.editHandler()

You can specify a closure that handles an edit event received from the underlying UITableView.

.hideWhen()

Finally, you can specify a closure that indicates when the row in the ConstantRowConfiguration should be hidden.

let rowConfiguration = ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>()
    .hideWhen({ () -> Bool in
        return self.shouldHideRow
    })

ModelRowConfiguration

A ModelRowConfiguration represents a group of rows that are defined by an array of some model type. It has all the same configuration options as ConstantRowConfiguration but closure callbacks you define will take a model parameter that represents the model associated with the actual row in question and an index parameter that indicates the position of the model in the current model sequence. Additionally, it’s constructor requires two generic type parameters. The first is an implementation of ModelConfigurableTableViewCell and the second is class conforming to the RowModel protocol.

It’s constructor can also be passed a function that returns an up-to-date model array. This is useful in dynamic UIs. When using the modelGenerator you can also optionally specify whether model generation should be optimized. When you pass true, the generator will only be called when invoking changeSetAfterPerformingOperation() or reloadData() on the TableViewConfigurator itself. Calling reloadData() on the underlying UITableView will produce no visible changes.

class PersonCell: UITableViewCell, ModelConfigurableTableViewCell {

    @IBOutlet var nameLabel: UILabel!
    @IBOutlet var ageLabel: UILabel!

    func configure(model: Person) {
        self.nameLabel.text = "(model.firstName) (model.lastName)"
        self.ageLabel.text = "Age (model.age)"
    }
}

let rowConfiguration = ModelRowConfiguration<PersonCell, Person>(models: self.people)

RowModel

The RowModel protocol allows ModelRowConfiguration to accurately diff successive states of the configuration for the purposes of animating table changes. The protocol requires a single property called identityTag that should uniquely identify any given RowModel. By default, each model gets an identityTag corresponding to its index in the current model sequence. This should be sufficient for cases where only the visibility of a model in the current sequence is changing, but will provide incorrect results when the sequence itself is modified.

ModelRowConfiguration adds a couple of additional "generator" attributes as well.

.heightGenerator()

You can specify a function that returns the most current height for a models row.

.estimatedHeightGenerator()

You can specify a function that returns the most current estimatedHeight for a models row.

SectionConfiguration

The real power of TableViewConfigurator presents itself when you begin combining RowConfiguration instances into a SectionConfiguration. Instances of RowConfiguration can be grouped in any order you want, and TableViewConfigurator will generate the correct results for the parts of UITableViewDataSource and UITableViewDelegate that it supports.

For example, suppose you wanted to create a UITableView section that was composed of a range of N elements sandwiched between two constant rows. Normally, this would be both annoying and error-prone. With TableViewConfigurator, it’s trivial:

let people = [Person(firstName: "John", lastName: "Doe", age: 50),
    Person(firstName: "Alex", lastName: "Great", age: 32),
    Person(firstName: "Napoléon", lastName: "Bonaparte", age: 18)]

let section = SectionConfiguration(rowConfigurations:
    [ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>(),
        ModelRowConfiguration<PersonCell, Person>(models: people),
        ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>()])

There are two additional configuration options available for SectionConfiguration

.headerTitle()

You can specify the String that should be used as the sections header title.

.footerTitle()

You can specify the String that should be used as the sections footer title.

TableViewConfigurator

Once you’ve created your RowConfiguration and SectionConfiguration instances, the final step is to put them together in your TableViewConfigurator and delegate to it from your controller where appropriate. TableViewConfigurator implements both UITableViewDataSource and UITableViewDelegate but it’s unlikely that it will implement all the pieces you might need, so it’s better to only delegate to it where appropriate from your controller.

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    let basicSection = SectionConfiguration(rowConfiguration:
        ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>()
            .height(44.0))

    let peopleRows = ModelRowConfiguration<PersonCell, Person>(models: self.people)
        .hideWhen({ (model) -> Bool in
            return self.hidePeople
        })
        .height(44.0)

    let peopleSection = SectionConfiguration(rowConfigurations:
        [ConstantRowConfiguration<SwitchCell>()
            .additionalConfig({ (cell) -> Void in
                cell.hideLabel.text = "Hide People"
                cell.hideSwitch.on = self.hidePeople
                cell.switchChangedHandler = { (on) -> Void in
                    self.configurator.animateChangeSet(self.configurator.changeSetAfterPerformingOperation({ self.hidePeople = on }))
                }
            })
            .height(44.0), peopleRows, ConstantRowConfiguration<BasicCell>().height(44.0)])

    let disclosureSection = SectionConfiguration(rowConfiguration:
        ConstantRowConfiguration<DisclosureCell>()
            .selectionHandler({ () -> Bool in
                self.performSegueWithIdentifier("showDetails", sender: self)
                return true
            })
            .height(44.0))

    self.configurator = TableViewConfigurator(tableView: tableView, sectionConfigurations:
        [basicSection, peopleSection, disclosureSection])
}

func numberOfSectionsInTableView(tableView: UITableView) -> Int {
    return self.configurator.numberOfSectionsInTableView(tableView)
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, titleForHeaderInSection section: Int) -> String? {
    return self.configurator.tableView(tableView, titleForHeaderInSection: section)
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, titleForFooterInSection section: Int) -> String? {
    return self.configurator.tableView(tableView, titleForFooterInSection: section)
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, numberOfRowsInSection section: Int) -> Int {
    return self.configurator.tableView(tableView, numberOfRowsInSection: section)
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, cellForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> UITableViewCell {
    return self.configurator.tableView(tableView, cellForRowAtIndexPath: indexPath)
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, heightForRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) -> CGFloat {
    return self.configurator.tableView(tableView, heightForRowAtIndexPath: indexPath)
}

func tableView(tableView: UITableView, didSelectRowAtIndexPath indexPath: NSIndexPath) {
    self.configurator.tableView(tableView, didSelectRowAtIndexPath: indexPath)
}

As you can see in the above example, TableViewConfigurator also supports UITableView row insertion and deletion.

.changeSetAfterPerformingOperation() / .animateChangeSet()

In order to support row and section insertion / deletion, all you need to do is setup your cells .hideWhen() handlers appropriately (or return nil from your model generator) and then call changeSetAfterPerformingOperation(). TableViewConfigurator will note changes in visibility before and after performing the operation you specify and will return those changes to you in the resulting TableViewChangeSet tuple. All you have to do is pass those changes to animatedChangeSet() or your UITableView directly and your rows / sections will be animated appropriately.

.indexPathsForRowConfiguration()

TableViewConfigurator also provides the indexPathsFor(rowConfiguration:) method so you can access the actual NSIndexPath array for a RowConfiguration. This is useful for (among other things) calling reloadRowsAtIndexPaths() on your UITableView to force your cells to reload from their models or constant configuration.

.refreshAllRowConfigurations()

Sometimes you may want to refresh the contents of a currently visible cell (or all visibile cells) without forcing a complete reload of the cell. For example, if your cell contained a UITextField, performing a reload (which destroys and replaces the existing cell) would cause the text field to lose focus. To address this, TableViewConfigurator provides the refreshAllRowConfigurations() method which non-destructively refreshes any visible cells from their model or constant configuration. Any offscreen cells will of course be updated when they become visible and UITableView queries it’s delegate.

Author

John Volk, [email protected]

License

TableViewConfigurator is available under the MIT license. See the LICENSE file for more info.

Latest podspec

{
    "name": "TableViewConfigurator",
    "version": "2.0.0",
    "summary": "A declarative approach to UITableView configuration resulting in thinner and more robust controllers.",
    "description": "* More declarative and easier to read approach to UITableView-based UI construction.n* Declarative approach allows the construction of smaller and more robust controllers.n* Extensive unit testing increases confidence in correctness of UI.",
    "homepage": "https://github.com/johntvolk/TableViewConfigurator",
    "license": "MIT",
    "authors": {
        "John Volk": "[email protected]"
    },
    "source": {
        "git": "https://github.com/johntvolk/TableViewConfigurator.git",
        "tag": "2.0.0"
    },
    "platforms": {
        "ios": "8.0"
    },
    "requires_arc": true,
    "source_files": "TableViewConfigurator/Classes/**/*",
    "dependencies": {
        "Dwifft": [
            "~> 0.6"
        ]
    },
    "pushed_with_swift_version": "3.0"
}

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