Latest 0.2
Homepage https://github.com/Zewo/HTTP
License MIT
Platforms ios 8.0, osx 10.9, requires ARC
Dependencies URI, Stream
Authors

Swift 2.2
Platform Linux
License MIT
Slack Status

HTTP provides:

  • HTTP request/response entities
  • HTTP parser/serializer
  • Protocols for HTTP server, client, router and middleware.

Documentation

MessageType

MessageType is a protocol for HTTP messages. It holds properties common to both requests and responses.

public protocol MessageType {
    var version: Version { get set }
    var headers: Headers { get set }
    var cookies: Cookies { get set }
    var body: Body { get set }
    var storage: Storage { get set }
}

version, headers, cookies and body are self-explanatory in regard to HTTP messages. storage is a special property that has no relationship with the HTTP protocol itself, but it’s used by the framework to carry custom data between middleware and a responder in a chain. MessageType is usually not used as a parameter in our APIs. It is mostly used when a computed property can be shared by both requests, and responses, like contentType, contentLength, etc.

Version

Version holds the version of the HTTP protocol associated with the HTTP message.

public typealias Version = (major: Int, minor: Int)

Headers

The Headers type is a typealias for a [HeaderName: HeaderValue] dictionary.

public typealias Headers = [HeaderName: HeaderValue]

Accessing raw headers

The HeaderName type is simply a wrapper for a case insensitive key. This means you can subscript the headers property without worrying if the header name is capitalized or lowercased, etc.

request.headers["Content-Type"] = "application/json"
if let contentType = request.headers["content-type"] {
    // do something with contentType
}

contentType will receive the value "application/json".

Accessing headers safely

The preferred way to access values from headers is through type-safe computed properties defined in extensions. For example, contentType is a computed property shared by requests and responses that provides a type-safe wrapper for media types.

extension MessageType {
    public var contentType: MediaType? {
        get {
            if let contentType = headers["Content-Type"] {
                return MediaType(string: contentType)
            }
            return nil
        }

        set {
            headers["Content-Type"] = newValue?.description
        }
    }
}

So instead of accessing the raw string you can get the MediaType value.

response.contentType = JSONMediaType
if let contentType = response.contentType {
    // do something with contentType
}

contentType will receive the value JSONMediaType.

We provide a number of type-safe computed properties in MessageType extensions. But if there’s some header we missed, you can always extend MessageType yourself and create your own type-safe header 😊.

Cookies

The Cookies type is a typealias for Set<Cookie>.

public typealias Cookies = Set<Cookie>

Cookies are handled differently than other HTTP headers specially because of the Set-Cookie header. The Cookie type has two required properties name and value and six optional properties; expires, maxAge, domain, path, secure, HTTPOnly.

let cookies: Cookies = [
    Cookie(name: "color", value: "blue"),
    Cookie(name: "token", value: "21AXC3QPQK", secure: true, HTTPOnly: true),
    Cookie(name: "theme", value: "dark", expires: "Wed, 08 Jul 2018 23:10:34 GMT"),
    Cookie(name: "token", value: "A8J3FB208S", maxAge: 60 * 60),
    Cookie(name: "color", value: "magenta", domain: ".zewo.io", path: "/"),
]

Warning: When setting cookies on a Request the attributes will be ignored by the HTTP parser/serializer as they’re only valid for Set-Cookie headers on an HTTP response.

Body

The Body enum can represent the HTTP body in two forms, Buffer or Stream. Buffer holds a Data struct containing the whole body. Stream contains any value that conforms to the StreamType protocol, which represents a continuous stream of binary data.

public enum Body {
    case Buffer(Data)
    case Stream(StreamType)
}

Body has some computed properties to facilitate the access of associated values.

request.body.buffer = [104, 101, 108, 108, 111]
request.body.isBuffer // true
request.body.isStream // false
request.body.stream // nil

response.body.stream = FileStream(file: someFile)
response.body.isBuffer // false
response.body.isStream // true
response.body.buffer // nil

Storage

The storage property is used to store custom data in the HTTP message. It is used to pass data between middlewares and responders.

request.storage["user"] = User(name: John)
if let user = request.storage["user"] as? User {
    // do something with user
}

Warning: Unlike headers, storage‘s keys are case sensitive. So be careful and subscript storage with the same key you used to store the value.

Accessing storage safely

Just like header, the preferred way to access values from the storage is through type-safe computed properties defined in extensions.

extension Request {
    public var user: User? {
        get {
            return storage["user"] as? User
        }

        set {
            storage["user"] = newValue
        }
    }
}

This way you don’t need to type-cast when unwrapping the value and you get a cleaner and safer API.

request.user = User(name: John)
if let user = request.user {
    // do something with user
}

Request

Request is a struct that represents an HTTP request. It conforms to the MessageType protocol from which it inherits a number of computed properties.

public struct Request: MessageType {
    public typealias Upgrade = (Response, StreamType) throws -> Void
    public var method: Method
    public var uri: URI
    public var version: Version
    public var headers: Headers
    public var cookies: Cookies
    public var body: Body
    public var upgrade: Upgrade?
    public var storage: Storage = [:]
}

Besides the properties required by MessageType, Request has the Method and URI properties which represent the request line of the HTTP request.

GET / HTTP/1.1

The Upgrade function is used to upgrade the request to another protocol (like WebSocket) in an HTTP client.

Creating a Request

When you’re on the client side you have to create a Request to send it to an HTTP server. There are plenty of initializers for a Request. Here are some examples.

// using URI with path
let uri = URI(path: "/")
let request = Request(method: .GET, uri: uri)

// using URI with path and query
let uri = URI(
    path: "/users",
    query: [
        "count": "10"
    ]
)
let request = Request(method: .GET, uri: uri)

// using headers and uri as String
let headers: Headers = [
    "Connection": "close"
]
let request = try Request(method: .GET, uri: "/users?count=10", headers: headers)

// using cookies
let cookies: Cookies = [
    Cookie(name: "color", value: "blue")
]
let request = try Request(method: .GET, uri: "/", cookies: cookies)

// using body as a buffer with Data
let hello: Data = [104, 101, 108, 108, 111]
let request = try Request(method: .POST, uri: "/hello", body: hello)

// using body as a buffer with DataConvertible (String)
let request = try Request(method: .POST, uri: "/hello", body: "hello")

// using body as a buffer with DataConvertible (JSON)
let json: JSON = [
    "hello": "world"
]
let request = try Request(method: .POST, uri: "/hello", body: json)

// using body as a stream
let fileStream = FileStream(file: file)
let request = try Request(method: .POST, uri: "/hello", body: fileStream)

Sometimes you want to upgrade your request to another protocol like WebSocket. You can take full control of the transport stream after the Response if you provide an Upgrade function.

let request = Request(method: .GET, uri: "/") { response, stream in
    // here you can do whatever you want with the transport stream
}

Warning: Don’t confuse the body stream with the transport stream. The body stream is used to send/receive binary data in the HTTP message body. While transport stream is the raw stream of binary data sent/received from the client and server. After you upgrade you can use the transport stream to communicate in any other protocol you want.

Response

Response is a struct that represents an HTTP response. It conforms to the MessageType protocol from which it inherits a number of computed properties.

public struct Response: MessageType {
    public typealias Upgrade = (Request, StreamType) throws -> Void
    public var status: Status
    public var version: Version
    public var headers: Headers
    public var cookies: Cookies
    public var body: Body
    public var upgrade: Upgrade?
    public var storage: Storage = [:]
}

Besides the properties required by MessageType, Response has the Status property which represents the status line of the HTTP response.

HTTP/1.1 200 OK

The Upgrade function is used to upgrade the response to another protocol (like WebSocket) in an HTTP server.

Installation

import PackageDescription

let package = Package(
    dependencies: [
        .Package(url: "https://github.com/Zewo/HTTP.git", majorVersion: 0, minor: 2)
    ]
)

Community

Slack

Join us on Slack.

License

HTTP is released under the MIT license. See LICENSE for details.

Latest podspec

{
    "name": "HTTP",
    "version": "0.2",
    "license": "MIT",
    "summary": "HTTP request/response entities for Swift 2 (Linux ready)",
    "homepage": "https://github.com/Zewo/HTTP",
    "authors": {
        "Paulo Faria": "[email protected].com"
    },
    "source": {
        "git": "https://github.com/Zewo/HTTP.git",
        "tag": "0.2"
    },
    "platforms": {
        "ios": "8.0",
        "osx": "10.9"
    },
    "source_files": "HTTP/**/*.swift",
    "dependencies": {
        "URI": [],
        "Stream": []
    },
    "requires_arc": true
}

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