Latest 1.0.2
Homepage https://github.com/mitchtreece/Eventful-Swift
License MIT
Platforms ios 8.0
Authors

Simple, lightweight, and useful event library for Swift.

Overview

Eventful-Swift is a Swift library for lightweight event dispatching & handling. By conforming to the EventDispatcher protocol, a class or struct can define various events (via Event<T> or EventRef<T>) that can be listened for and reacted upon. This library is a work in progress.

Installation

CocoaPods

Eventful-Swift is integrated with CocoaPods!

  1. Add the following to your Podfile:
    use_frameworks!
    pod 'Eventful-Swift'
  2. In your project directory, run pod install
  3. Import the EventfulSwift module wherever you need it
  4. Profit

Manually

You can also manually add the source files to your project.

  1. Clone this git repo
  2. Add all the Swift files in the Eventful-Swift/ subdirectory to your project
  3. Profit

Events

Dispatching Events

Using Event<T> or EventRef<T>, you can easily add actionreaction based event handling to your existing code.

class Person: EventDispatcher {

    var name: String
    var age: Int
    var event_died = EventRef<Bool>()

    func removeEventListeners() {
        self.event_died.removeListeners()
    }

    init(name: String, age: Int) {
        self.name = name
        self.age = age
    }

    deinit {
        self.event_died.dispatch(true)
    }

}

In the above example, the Person class conforms to the EventDispatcher protocol, and defines one event: event_died which gets posted when the Person instance is about to be deallocated. The event is of the EventRef<T> type, where T is a generic type representing the value that will be passed back to the event’s listeners.

You can either make your events be of the Event<T> type – which is a struct. Or the EventRef<T> type – which is a class. Just depends on your situation. Under the hood, the EventRef<T> class holds a private Event<T> struct, which it forwards all calls to.

You dispatch your event by simply calling it’s dispatch(value: T) function, passing in the value to return to the event’s listeners.

Registering an Event Listener

Listening and reacting to events is just as easy as dispatching them. You simply register as a listener and assign a reaction closure.

var person: Person? = Person(name: "Bob", age: 23)
person?.event_died.addListener { (value: Bool) in
    print("Bob died 😭")
}

print("(person?.name) was born 😄")
print("(person?.name) is living his life...")

person = nil

The console output will read:

Bob was born 😄
Bob is living his life...
Bob died 😭

In the above example, we added a listener to our person’s died event. When the event was dispatched we simply printed Bob died 😭 to the console.

Removing Event Listeners

Just like adding event listeners, we can also remove them. The addListener function is actually defined as: addListener(handler: (T) -> ()) -> EventToken<T>. It returns an EventToken<T> which can later be used to remove a listener from an event. The above example can be modified to show this:

var person: Person? = Person(name: "Bob", age: 23)
let eventToken = person?.event_died.addListener { (value: Bool) in
    print("Bob died 😭")
}

print("(person?.name) was born 😄")
print("(person?.name) is living his life...")

person = nil

person?.event_died.removeListener(token: eventToken)

Alternatively, you can remove all listeners from a specific event by calling an event’s removeListeners() function. The EventDispatcher protocol also requires that a removeEventListeners() function be implemented on any event-generating entity. Because of this, you can remove all listeners for all events by calling removeEventListeners() – assuming the event-generating entity has correctly implemented the function.

// Removes all listeners for a specific event
person?.event_died.removeListeners()

// Removes all listeners for every event on an entity
person?.removeEventListeners()

Eventful Values

The EventfulValue<T> type is a custom EventDispatcher that dispatches events when it’s underlying value is about to change, and after it’s value has successfully been changed. Simply put, it’s a tiny value-wrapper that mimics KVO value changes. EventfulValue<T> defines two events:

  • event_willChangeValue
  • event_didChangeValue
var greeting = EventfulValue("Hello")
greeting.event_didChangeValue.addListener { (info: EventfulValueInfo)
    print("greeting: didChangeValue - was: "(info.oldValue)", now: "(info.newValue)"")
}

greeting.set("Bonjour")

This will set the value of greeting to "Bonjour", and fire off our variable’s didChangeValue event. Notice closure provides a variable of the EventfulValueInfo<T> type. This is a struct that contains both the old and new values of the changed variable.

Working with EventfulValue

Because the EventfulValue<T> type "wraps" the actual value for event handling, simple set/get statements will not work. Instead, you must directly access it’s underlying value via the value member. You can also use the get() -> T or set(value: T) functions.

var x = EventfulValue(7)

// Will not work:
x = 13

// Will work:
x.value = 13
x.set(23)

let xValue = x.get()
print("value of x is (xValue)")

Shorthand Syntax

Having to manually type out EventfulValue, and access the underlying value member can get tedious. Luckily, there is also a shorthand syntax for initializing, modifying, and retrieving this value.

// These are all valid ways to initialize an EventfulValue
var x = EventfulValue(10)
var y = ~("Hello, world!")
var z = ~[1, 2, 3]

// EventfulValue's can be modified by using the '~>>' operator
x ~>> 13
y ~>> "Hola!"
z ~>> [4, 5, 6]

// An EventfulValue's value member can be accessed via a postfix '~'
let xValue = x~
let yValue = y~
print("value of z is (z~)")

You can initialize an EventfulValue by prefixing a value with an tilde (~). You can optionally also surround the value with parenthesis. The ~>> assignment operator can be used to directly assign a value to an EventfulValue‘s underlying value member. Lastly, you can directly access the underlying value member with a postfix tilde (~).

Upcoming Features

  • EventfulValue subscripting. This will make working with tuples, arrays, and dictionaries easier.
  • More built-in EventDispatcher classes.

Latest podspec

{
    "name": "Eventful-Swift",
    "module_name": "EventfulSwift",
    "version": "1.0.2",
    "summary": "Simple, lightweight, and useful event library for Swift.",
    "description": "Eventful-Swift is a Swift library for lightweight event dispatching & handling.nBy conforming to the EventDispatcher protocol, a class or struct can define variousnevents (via Event or EventRef) that can be listened for and reacted upon.",
    "homepage": "https://github.com/mitchtreece/Eventful-Swift",
    "license": {
        "type": "MIT",
        "file": "LICENSE"
    },
    "authors": {
        "Mitch Treece": "[email protected]"
    },
    "social_media_url": "http://twitter.com/MitchTreece",
    "platforms": {
        "ios": "8.0"
    },
    "source": {
        "git": "https://github.com/mitchtreece/Eventful-Swift.git",
        "tag": "1.0.2"
    },
    "source_files": "Eventful-Swift/*.{swift}"
}

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